The study of marine life is called marine biology, and a person who studies marine life is called a marine biologist. The study of marine life is called marine biology, and a person who studies marine life is called a marine biologist. At a fundamental level, marine life influences the nature of the planet. From sharks and sea turtles to ecosystems and corals, you’re in the right place to dive deep into life under the sea.

Spilled toxins, low oxygen dead zones, marine debris, rising ocean temperatures, overfishing and coastal development are daily threats to marine life. Explore the marine life encyclopedia to learn fun facts and learn more about your favorite animals.

What are the 3 types of marine life?

Biogenic sediments make up the other 55% of the total sediment and come from the skeletal remains of marine protists (unicellular plankton and benthos organisms). The uppermost part of a marine ecosystem is the euphotic zone, which extends up to 200 meters (656 feet) below the surface. Marine species range in size from microscopic phytoplankton, which can be up to 0.02 microns in size, to giant whales such as the blue whale — the largest known animal, 33 m (108 ft) long. Macroalgae (algae), like microalgae, are technically marine protists, as they are not real plants.

What are some examples of marine life?

Different groups of marine worms are only distantly related, so they are found in different phyla, such as annelida (segmented worms), chaetognatha (arrowworms), phoronida (horseshoe worms) and hemichordata. Some scientists are of the opinion that radiation from echinoderms was responsible for the marine revolution in the Mesozoic era. Some marine primary producers are specialized bacteria and archaea, which are chemotrophs that produce their own food by gathering around hydrothermal sources and cold springs and using chemosynthesis. The first seabirds evolved in the Cretaceous period, and modern seabird families emerged in the Paleogene.

References: