Wave Swell Energy, an Australian clean energy company, developed an extraordinary wave energy harvesting platform. Named UniWave 200, the platform is capable of harvesting much more energy from sea waves than other similar technologies.

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UniWave is a floatable device that can be towed to the desired destination anywhere on the ocean. Once installed, the device can be collected to the local grid, where it delivers the electricity generated.

Related: First-of-its-kind device prototype harnesses renewable energy from ocean waves

Although there have been many devices developed previously to harness wave energy, UniWave 200 operates in a different and more efficient manner. For this device, wave swell forces water into a specially built concrete chamber through an outlet. When it recedes, it creates a huge vacuum which sucks air into the turbine. Additionally, it collects energy from a whole column of water that reaches the special concrete chamber. It is, therefore, more efficient than similar devices in this regard.

Wave Swell Energy has already held trials for the device and is planning to expand its projects. Last year, the company built a 20 kilowatt test platform near King Island. The platform has successfully stood up to the fierce waves of Bass Strait and has continuously supplied power to the Island’s grid for the past 12 months.

“One key achievement has been to deliver real-world results in Tasmanian ocean conditions to complement the AMC test modeling,” said WSE CEO Paul Geason in a press release. “In some instances, the performance of our technology in the ocean has exceeded expectations due to the lessons we’ve learned through the project, technological improvements and the refinements we have made over the year.”

The company has been using the King Island platform to show that the system could be adopted in other parts. The King Island platform is expected to continue serving until the end of 2022.

Via Wonderful Engineering

Lead image via Wave Swell Energy



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